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Milling

We have a mill. We make logs into boards The End. Just kidding. Ok. Short history lesson: Throughout the ages, people have needed the ability to cut logs into boards.The earliest known mechanical mill was one in Rome, powered by water and dating back to the 3rd century AD. It soon spread across Europe through the 11th Century.   Until the 1800s, men would cut logs using a whipsaw. One man would stand on the log and the other man below him in a pit or under a support and they would work the saw back and forth, slowly cutting the log into boards.          When the Industrial Revolution hit in the 1800s, steam power allowed for...

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7 Tips : Injuries

So here's the thing…. sometimes people get hurt in carpentry shops. You know what I'm talking about. Cue the elderly old men again with beards telling you haunting stories of how they “chopped off 3 whole fingers on the table saw” or “got my hand caught in the gears”...... Dang. BUT the good thing is that often, if you do things smart, you won't get hurt. That bad. Okay.... Let me explain. Every single carpenter is bound to come up against slivers, (splinters) cuts, bruises, pinches and whacked knuckles or stubbed toes. It just happens! We work in an almost manual labor job peeps, there ain't no way you ain’t gonna get hurt with little things like that. It comes...

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“Wood Diaries: Russian Olive”

Russian Olive is considered a noxious weed in many places in the United States, especially here in Utah. Many people try and get rid of the tree because it competes with other native vegetation and is very drought tolerant, often taking over spots along the banks of rivers and streams as it sucks on the moisture and nutrients. Birds eat the seeds like crazy and spread them everywhere, again affecting other plants in the area as the range of this plant grows. But despite all these negative outlooks on the tree, the wood is beautiful! Russian Olive is a yellowish brown color which has amazing figure and is often used in many of our ties and designer products. Its a...

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I Have Accepted My Fate….

So here’s the thing about being a carpenter or one that works in a carpentry shop…. you end up eating a lot of sawdust. I’m pretty sure that as the 3rd generation here and at 21 years of age I have most likely eaten at least two pounds of sawdust. My dad, Todd, (a bit older than 21) has probably eaten at least 6. Now of course this is me counting from the time that I was toddling around in diapers but still….that’s a lot. When you start out, you are always sneezing and coughing and blowing off all the sawdust over yourself, your projects, your water bottle or half eaten apples sitting on the corner of the table…. but...

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Get To Know Us A Bit

Dear Readers, I have never written a blog. I have never even really read a blog. Oh well. So, when I hear the work “woodshop” I think of bearded men wearing leather tool belts and aprons and where you learn to make tables from old 2x4s and bookshelves for your closet. Now, we have our fair share of “men with beards” here but there is a lot more to us and the average carpentry shop than you might think. Here at Woodlands, there are 5 of us. Todd and Lee are the owners and then come their children: Jess (26), Tara (21) and Jason (20) who have grown up in this shop since we were small. As kids we gotten...

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